(Prints size 80x107 cm, 50x67 cm)
  
A real spring has come to the city, followed by rains & blooming. Pressed by rumors about the upcoming referendum, Kherson residents continue to leave en masse. Russian flags appear and disappear on administrative buildings. Photographs from the monuments to the heroes of the Maidan also disappear. Chernobaevka once again declares itself with powerful explosions of detonated ammunition depots. The Russian military bolsters defenses, roams in search of alcohol and cannabis, and sometimes deserts. But on the food front, Russian products have gone on an active offensive, pushing Ukrainian goods bled dry by the humanitarian blockade from the shelves of local stores. Some entrepreneurs are already preparing to surrender. Propaganda leaflets are spread on the streets informing us about the good purpose of all the obscurantism going on around. Thanks to the Ukrainian Internet, where even pensioners watch and read Ukrainian news, the city keeps holding.
In my traditional block about tales and storytellers there will be a lot of geometry and psychology. It is dedicated to the great and mighty Stephen Karpman’s dramatic triangle. I recommend studying its essence to everyone who has not done this yet. Here I will briefly describe its mechanism. Studying behavior through transactional analysis, Karpman has found that all psychological games follow a certain pattern. He depicted it in the form of a triangle with r vertices in it - the roles that all the participants alternately play: Savior, Aggressor and Victim. In whatever role any of the participants of the life drama starts, having played it, he/she switches to another, and then to the third, again returns to the first and moves through life like this from dawn to dawn. The most striking example of this geometry is the typical family of an alcoholic. Usually, an alcoholic husband starts it as a victim (of his addiction), his wife plays the role of a savior, forcing him to fight his addiction, switching to the role of an aggressor when the husband breaks down and goes into a binge, or a victim when she cries to a girlfriend or mother about her hard fate. When a husband switches roles, he acts as an aggressor when he beats his wife, she in turn becomes a victim, and a neighbor, relative, police or their own child comes to save her. The tragedy here is that people disappear into this Bermuda Triangle, burning through all their life energy in the emotional seesaw of drama. It extends to all interpersonal relationships and is reflected in the culture of society (soap operas), as well as its domestic and foreign policies. So, first there is a victim of Western colonialism getting up from its knees. When it has a resource, it becomes a savior for the oppressed Russian people in neighboring unfriendly countries. To save them, it switches to the aggressor and conducts special operations until falling to its knees again to become a victim. Inside the country, the processes are the same. Aggressors are sounding very loudly from the screens, tomorrow they will become victims, responsible for losses, and saviors will come in their place. In this Bermuda triangle, all the resources of the economy disappear, preventing the population and its country from developing. It will be hard to believe, because Stephen Karpman described the bottom of personal development and it has nothing to do with the greatness of the culture that other peoples will follow. Alas, the Russian military, having entered the territory of Ukraine, first of all try to find the booze or weeds, and do not read Pushkin's poems to local children (so as not to repeat about stolen washing machines, iPhones, rapes and murders). And no matter how much you would like to believe in a miracle, a palace coup will not change anything. In place of one storyteller, another will come and the triangle will spin with the same force, and maybe even more abruptly. The morning begins with responsibility and action. I turn on the light and wish you good luck!
“The Captured House” exhibition at Alte Münze, Berlin, Germany
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